Next Stage of 3D Virtual 1820 Newcastle Set To Proceed

View of Newcastle Foreshore circa 1820 by Charles Martin

View of Newcastle Foreshore circa 1820 by Charles Martin

The next stage of the eagerly anticipated 3D Virtual Newcastle project is set to begin in August 2013. Thanks to the kind generous donors to the Vera Deacon Regional History Fund, the University is able to engage 3D Design & Illustration artist Charles Martin to add greater detail to his original models and flythroughs launched late last year and that appeared on the Front Pages of the Newcastle Herald. See: http://coalriver.wordpress.com/2012/11/29/virtual-newcastle-circa-1800-1830-ad/

View of Newcastle 1820 by Charles Martin

View of Newcastle 1820 by Charles Martin

The next phase will incorporate high resolution detail from a variety of key paintings and sketches held across the nation. Charles  will be creating a computer generated 3D model of Newcastle as it existed in the Aboriginal/Pre-Colonial to Macquarie Period 1800s-1820s.

The project  involves:
– examining early plans, artworks and documentation relating to the early Newcastle landscape
– create a detailed model of Newcastle at two time periods using GIS data as the building block
– create models in Sketchup Pro of early landforms, houses and structures, public buildings etc
– attention could be given to the obvious land and water edge forms, but also flora types and distribution.
– liaise with academics, students and community researchers to ensure model is as accurate as possible.
– overlay the detail from the paintings, engravings and artworks onto the 3D generated models and the place them onto the 3D landscape on Google Earth.
– generate fly throughs using visualisation software packages for distribution via web and databases.

View of early 1820 Newcastle scene by Charles Martin

View of early 1820 Newcastle scene by Charles Martin

Charles will be incorporating details from the paintings of Joseph Lycett and Edward Charles Close, that were recently on display in the historic Treasures of the Macquarie Era Exhibition at the Newcastle Art Gallery, and featured in the Weekender article by Mike Scanlon in the Newcastle Herald on the 20th July 2013.

"Painting a bigger view" by Mike Scanlon. NH 20 July 2013 p.14

“Painting a bigger view” by Mike Scanlon. NH 20 July 2013 p.14

Virtual Newcastle circa 1800 -1830 AD

Screen shot of 3D Virtual Model of Newcastle as it looked circa 1830, by Charles Martin, with assistance from Russell Rigby

If you have an interest in 3D mapping for research and teaching, or just want to have a look at the work of Charles Martin and his Virtual Newcastle from 1830, you are very welcome to come along to the next meeting of the Coal River Working Party to discuss construction of a Newcastle Time Machine. It will be the final meeting for the year.

Charles Martin (a design and illustration contractor for EJE Architecture) has created a series of 3D Newcastle fly throughs from 1800 to 1830, anatomically correct and based upon authentic historical archival maps and records. With the assistance of Russell Rigby, Charles has created a series of 3D Virtual fly-throughs of Newcastle circa 1800 and 1830, the latter being based upon the John Armstrong Survey 1830 (in the Alexander Turnbull Library New Zealand) and the Sir Thomas Mitchell Sketches 1828 (in the Mitchell, Sydney).

It would be great if we could obtain sponsorship to commission him and a team to use the model to incorporate the Edward Charles Close panoramas, Lycett details etc to recreate Newcastle during Wallis/Macquarie period, early 1810-1820s.

We are hoping to expand it into a truly co-operative and interdisciplinary teaching/research tool across the University. We would love you to see it and discuss some ideas with others with an interest in such virtual environments.

The meeting will be held on Monday 3rd December at the IDC (Confucius Centre) on University Drive from 1-3pm. The Industry Development Centre (IDC) is on University Drive, it has a golden seahorse on the front. See the campus map here: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/maps/callaghan/.

Gionni Di Gravio
University Archivist and
Chair, University of Newcastle’s Coal River Working Party

Screen shot of 3D Virtual Model of Newcastle as it looked circa 1830, by Charles Martin, with assistance from Russell Rigby

3D VIRTUAL FLYTHROUGHS

MEDIA COVERAGE

(Courtesy of the Newcastle Herald)

Time Machine - Newcastle Herald Front Page

Time Machine – Newcastle Herald Front Page

'Fly through history for new city outlook' - Newcastle Herald p.4-5

‘Fly through history for new city outlook’ – Newcastle Herald p.4-5

Editorial - Even the past is digital

Editorial – Even the past is digital

Video: Fly through 3D History of Newcastle

by Eddie O’Reilly can be accessed here:

http://www.theherald.com.au/story/1157494/video-fly-through-3d-history-of-newcastle/?cs=310

The Novocastrian Time Machine

The Novocastrian Time Machine by Julie Martin

The Novocastrian Time Machine is an augmented reality narrative infrastructure design concept by Julie Martin for Watt Street in Newcastle (Australia).

Julie Martin is Creative Director for Virtual Reality Entertainment Systems Pty Ltd who prepared the concept for City of Newcastle Council’s City Evolutions Project that aims to install art installations in Watt Street to brighten up the city’s landscape.

Julie visited the University of Newcastle Archives on 19th October 2012 to show us her proposal that she created using inspirations from our historical research and image collections. She spoke with University Archivist and Chair of the Coal River Working Party, Gionni Di Gravio, who recorded the presentation.

Regular readers of this blog will know our fascination with constructing time machines from 2008 see: http://coalriver.wordpress.com/2008/03/13/the-coal-river-time-machine/

The Presentation in PDF format can be viewed here: Novocastrian Time Machine by Julie Martin (10 MB PDF File)

‘The Midden’ is Launched

Students show an eye for design - Andrew Cavill's 'Midden' is launched

Students show an eye for design - Andrew Cavill's 'Midden' is launched

One of our final year Master of Architecture students Mr Andrew Cavill has, for the past year, been working on a design for an iconic interpretation, discovery and learning centre at the Coal River Heritage Precinct in Newcastle East. ‘The Midden’, as it has been called, officially went on Exhibition this week.

On behalf of the University’s Coal River Working Party we congratulate Andrew for the outstanding work and commitment he has undertaken for this project. We are delighted with his design and words cannot express the joy of seeing such a beautiful concept reach fruition.

We hope that it can inspire a refreshed approach to re-modelling our city’s birthplace.

I want you all to imagine a beautiful and iconic ‘Newcastle Opera House’ style building at the Coal River Precinct, birthplace of this city. At dusk, above our heads, the light cannon sculptures (as proposed in the Boyce Pizzey Cultural Tourism plan) illuminating our foundation stories, come into being one after another, these light beams culminating together in a central point or ‘star’ above the precinct and its Centre. On earth, the Conservatorium orchestra and choirs perform our sesquicentenary piece. This would be such a beautiful cultural happening for the City. We hope and pray that one day such visions can become a reality.

Gionni Di Gravio – University Archivist and Chair – University’s Coal River Working Party

Please Click here for the NBN News Story – ‘Visions for Newcastle’  featuring Andrew briefly speaking about his design. Broadcast Date: November 13, 2009.
http://www.nbntv.com.au/index.php/2009/11/13/visions-for-newcastle/

Exhibition Panel No. 1 for 'The Midden' by Andrew Cavill

Exhibition Panel No. 2 for 'The Midden' by Andrew Cavill

Design for Coal River – Mulubinba Interpretative Centre

Andrew Cavill is a 5th Year Architecture student at the University of Newcastle that has chosen to design an interpretative centre for the Coal River Heritage Precinct as his final year project.

Vision of heritage showcase

Vision of heritage showcase

Experiments in Coal River 3D

Here are some links to the 3D experiments provided by Standford University in the United States. They have an algorithm that can create 3d imagery from a 2d photograph. I sent them a number of early paintings of Nobbys and the Coal River Heritage Precinct.

If you are viewing these images through Internet Explorer, you will see an animation, with a note above relating to downloading with Shockwave or Cortona VRML client. You can download either, but I reckon the Cortona client is fantastic and only 1.48 MB in size, so download that one and you can see what amazing stuff they are up to here. You can also upload your own images that they will 3d-ify for you.

Click on the image and move your arrow buttons to see what I mean. If you click on the flash movie you will get a short animation.

Aborigines resting by camp fire, near the mouth of the Hunter River, Newcastle, N.S.W. c.1817
(Courtesy of National Library of Australia):
http://make3d.stanford.edu/images/view3D/41554

Lewin’s Nobby Island 1807
(Courtesy of Newcastle Regional Art Gallery):
http://make3d.stanford.edu/images/view3D/38705

Sophia Campbell painting of Nobbys circa 1820
(Courtesy of National Library of Australia):
http://make3d.stanford.edu/images/view3D/41553

Sophia Campbell view from Nobbys Island circa 1816?
(Courtesy of National Library of Australia):
http://make3d.stanford.edu/images/view3D/41551

Nobbys from Mulubinba Cottage circa 1830s
(Courtesy of Newcastle Region Library):
http://make3d.stanford.edu/images/view3D/38704